Dances With Wolves


Dances with Wolves
April 5, 1863
I have arrived at my post and found it to be completely unmanned. Fort Sedgewick appears to have been abandoned for some time. I do not know what has happened to the men that were posted here, but I am anxious to hear from someone. Fort Sedgewick is my post, but I have no one to report to. I don\'t know what to do. I can only communicate if I leave, and I don\'t want to abandon my post. I have assigned myself cleanup duty, and will attempt to restore the supply house. It is a tough job for one man but I have plenty of time. All is quiet on the frontier.
Lt. John J. Dunbar, U.S.A.
April 25, 1863
Today I made contact with an Indian. He is the first man I have seen since my being here. He tried to steal my horse, when I appeared I spooked him and he ran off. I am sure there are many more in the area. I will begin to prepare for another visit, if troops don\'t arrive soon, all may be lost. I have decided to ration my goods. The missing replacement should be here anytime; it should not be too much longer. I have been patrolling the area day-to-day and have found nothing. Except there is a wolf who seems to interested in the activity here. If he arrives again tomorrow I will name him Two Socks for the milky white socks on both front paws.
Lt. John J. Dunbar, U.S.A.
May 20, 1863
Many things have happened since my last entry. The Indians have come to visit a few times and our meetings are friendly, though they are frustrating due to the language barrier. It is always the same two men who come; six or seven other warriors accompany them. One of them must be a warrior leader, he is very strong and fiery. The other is very quiet and I think wise. We have learned to speak a few words of each other\'s language, but not many. I also have visited their camp briefly. I was very excited to see how they lived and I enjoyed myself. I smoked their pipes with them, sat around the campfire, and then was escorted out by the quiet Indian. I look forward to another visit with my neighbors.
Lt. John J. Dunbar, U.S.A.
June 1, 1863
Today great progress was made with my neighbors. They have a white woman living in their camp named Stands With A Fist that can interprit my conversations with the Indians. I now know the name of the quiet Indian is Kicking Bird. They have named me Dances With Wolves. I now know what questions the Indians are asking me and the same for them. The quiet one and I have become good friends. He is constantly asking me if more white man will come into these lands. I just cannot bring myself to tell him. I feel that our relationship will only grow stronger.
Lt. John J. Dunbar, U.S.A.
June 29, 1863
So much has happened since my last entry; I don\'t know where to begin. I now can speak the language of my neighbors thanks to the teaching of Stands With A Fist.
It took me quite a while but I am pleased with how fast I am learning. I have been spending much more time with my neighbors and I have been able to learn much more about them. Last conversation Kicking Bird and I had, he asked again about more white men coming. I told him there would be more white man than the stars; the color went out of his face and he looked lifeless. I am sorry for telling him.
Lt. John J. Dunbar, U.S.A.